Turning any sound into a synth in FL Studio

Blogpost written by Tantu Beats. Read time: 4m.

As producers, we’re constantly looking for new sounds. Because of this, I thought it would be cool to share this little production trick. This is how you turn any sound into a playable synth in FL Studio.

Pick a sound

Pick a sound you want to turn into a synthesizer. This can be anything. For this example, I’m using a snaredrum from the Subway sample pack, available for free here.

1.-select-a-sound-2

Generate tone

In Edison, press the 'loop' toggle to loop the sound and. while it's looping, tighten the loop points until you start to hear a recognizable tone. Adjust the points slightly until you're happy with how the tone sounds.

1-2

Record

Open a new instance of the Edison sampler, press record and play the note you have just created from the loop points. If you're trying to recreate these steps in another DAW, any other native sampler or sampler VST will let you achieve the same results.

3.-Record-the-tone

Pitch

Use a pitch corrector (like FL's Newtone), Melodyne or Autotune to make sure the tone of your sound is in key. The tone I generated for this example was pitched just a little under a G tone, so I brought it up to a G.

4.-pitch

Loop

Create loop-points so you’ll be able to play the sound for as long as you hold a key. This can be done in almost every sampler.

5.-loop

Set root note

Set the root note of the sound correctly. You want the tones you’re hearing to actually correspond with the keys you are playing. This will make it much easier to combine the sound with other melodic instruments. Since my tone sample is a G, I’m setting G as the root note of the sample.

6.-root-note

Effects

This is the fun part. Use any effect (EQ, chorus, distortion, pitch shifters, multi-effects, etc.) to shape the sound to your liking. You can make it smooth, rough, wobbly, loud, etc. Stacking effects works great, but to save myself some time I’m just selecting an RC-20 preset.

7.-fx-1

Set the ADSR

Now set the ADSR (Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release) of the synth you built to create the movement you want it to have. I’m choosing for a long attack without any release to create a ‘pumping’ feel.

8.-ADSR

You did it! Now that you have built your own synthesizer, you can use it to create a chord progression or melody. You’re the only person in the world with this specific sound. You pretty much built your own wave-table synthesizer.

Enjoy the endless possibilities with this little trick!

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